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Cell. 2018 Mar 8;172(6):1306-1318. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2018.01.034.

Protein-Injection Machines in Bacteria.

Author information

1
Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06536, USA. Electronic address: jorge.galan@yale.edu.
2
Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology, Birkbeck, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX, UK; Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: g.waksman@mail.cryst.bbk.ac.uk.

Abstract

Many bacteria have evolved specialized nanomachines with the remarkable ability to inject multiple bacterially encoded effector proteins into eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells. Known as type III, type IV, and type VI secretion systems, these machines play a central role in the pathogenic or symbiotic interactions between multiple bacteria and their eukaryotic hosts, or in the establishment of bacterial communities in a diversity of environments. Here we focus on recent progress elucidating the structure and assembly pathways of these machines. As many of the interactions shaped by these machines are of medical importance, they provide an opportunity to develop novel therapeutic approaches to combat important human diseases.

PMID:
29522749
PMCID:
PMC5849082
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2018.01.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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