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Endocr Rev. 2018 Jun 1;39(3):369-386. doi: 10.1210/er.2017-00234.

Lessons From the Testosterone Trials.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
2
Research Program in Men's Health: Aging and Metabolism, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Baylor College of Medicine and Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center, Houston, Texas.
4
Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, and Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.
5
Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Bioinformatics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
6
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
7
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
8
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, La Jolla, California.
9
Division of Endocrinology, Harbor-University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center and Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Torrance, California.
10
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
11
Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
12
Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
13
Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
14
New England Research Institutes, Inc., Watertown, Massachusetts.
15
Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
16
Divisions of Endocrinology and Geriatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.
17
Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Molecular Medicine, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
18
Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
19
Division of Cardiology, Harbor-University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center and Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Torrance, California.
20
Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Section of Vascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
21
Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Emory Heart and Vascular Center, and Emory Women's Heart Center, Atlanta, Georgia.
22
Center for the Study of Aging, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
23
Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California.
24
O.N. Diagnostics, LLC, Berkeley, California.

Abstract

The Testosterone Trials (TTrials) were a coordinated set of seven placebo-controlled, double-blind trials in 788 men with a mean age of 72 years to determine the efficacy of increasing the testosterone levels of older men with low testosterone. Testosterone treatment increased the median testosterone level from unequivocally low at baseline to midnormal for young men after 3 months and maintained that level until month 12. In the Sexual Function Trial, testosterone increased sexual activity, sexual desire, and erectile function. In the Physical Function Trial, testosterone did not increase the distance walked in 6 minutes in men whose walk speed was slow; however, in all TTrial participants, testosterone did increase the distance walked. In the Vitality Trial, testosterone did not increase energy but slightly improved mood and depressive symptoms. In the Cognitive Function Trial, testosterone did not improve cognitive function. In the Anemia Trial, testosterone increased hemoglobin in both men who had anemia of a known cause and in men with unexplained anemia. In the Bone Trial, testosterone increased volumetric bone mineral density and the estimated strength of the spine and hip. In the Cardiovascular Trial, testosterone increased the coronary artery noncalcified plaque volume as assessed using computed tomographic angiography. Although testosterone was not associated with more cardiovascular or prostate adverse events than placebo, a trial of a much larger number of men for a much longer period would be necessary to determine whether testosterone increases cardiovascular or prostate risk.

PMID:
29522088
PMCID:
PMC6287281
DOI:
10.1210/er.2017-00234
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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