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Menopause. 2018 Jul;25(7):811-816. doi: 10.1097/GME.0000000000001075.

25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and biomarkers of ovarian reserve.

Author information

1
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.
2
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Durham, NC.
3
Biostatistics and Computational Biology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Durham, NC.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to examine the associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and biomarkers of ovarian reserve in a large community-based sample of women.

METHODS:

In 2010 to 2016, women aged 30 to 44 years without any known fertility problems were recruited from the Chapel Hill, NC area for a prospective time-to-pregnancy cohort study. At enrollment 561 women provided a blood sample that was used to measure 25(OH)D, anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), follicle-stimulating hormone, and inhibin-B. Unadjusted associations were estimated with Spearman correlation coefficients. Multivariable linear regression was used to estimate associations of 25(OH)D with ovarian reserve biomarkers, after adjusting for age, race, body mass index, smoking history, and recent use of hormonal birth control.

RESULTS:

The mean 25(OH)D was 36 ng/mL (SD = 11 ng/mL). 25(OH)D was not correlated with AMH, follicle-stimulating hormone, or inhibin-B (all r < 0.03). Multivariable results with continuous hormonal outcomes were also null. For dichotomous outcomes, there was a tendency for insufficient 25(OH)D (<30 ng/mL) to be associated with low AMH (<0.7 ng/mL) (odds ratio [95% CI]: 1.8 [0.9-4]).

CONCLUSIONS:

For the most part, 25(OH)D was not associated with ovarian reserve biomarkers in a group of women trying to become pregnant. We found some evidence that low 25(OH)D (<30 ng/mL) was associated with low AMH, but this should be confirmed in studies with a higher prevalence of low 25(OH)D.

PMID:
29509595
PMCID:
PMC6014875
[Available on 2019-07-01]
DOI:
10.1097/GME.0000000000001075

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