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Ann Thorac Surg. 2018 May;105(5):1469-1475. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.01.072. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

Timing and Risk Factors Associated With Venous Thromboembolism After Lung Cancer Resection.

Author information

1
Section of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
2
Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
3
Division of Thoracic Surgery, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.
4
Section of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. Electronic address: justin.blasberg@yale.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few studies have examined the risk factors for and timing of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing surgical procedures for lung cancer, and there are limited data to formulate guidelines for extended VTE prophylaxis after hospital discharge. This study sought to identify risk factors for postdischarge VTE after lung resection.

METHODS:

Patients undergoing anatomic resection for lung cancer were identified in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2005 to 2015. Patients' demographic and clinical characteristics were evaluated for any association with postdischarge VTE. Predictors of postdischarge VTE were identified using multivariable analysis.

RESULTS:

VTE occurred in 1.6% (234) of the 14,308 patients identified; 44% (102) VTE events occurred after hospital discharge. Undergoing pneumonectomy was associated with a threefold increased risk for postdischarge VTE compared with lobectomy (2.0% versus 0.6%, p < 0.01), as was open resection compared with minimally invasive resection (0.8% versus 0.6%, p < 0.01). Prolonged operative time (>75th percentile) was also associated with an increased risk for postdischarge VTE compared with shorter operative time. Multivariable analysis identified older age, obesity, pneumonectomy, and prolonged operative time as independent predictors of postdischarge VTE.

CONCLUSIONS:

Significant proportions of VTE events occur after hospital discharge. Although there are data to suggest that the risk for VTE extends beyond this period, few patients are managed with postdischarge prophylaxis. These data suggest that postdischarge prophylaxis should be considered for those patients at high risk for VTE, particularly for older patients, those who are obese, and after extended or lengthy resections.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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