Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2018 Feb 7;13(2):e0191004. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0191004. eCollection 2018.

Positive age beliefs protect against dementia even among elders with high-risk gene.

Author information

1
Social and Behavioral Science Department, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
4
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, West Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
5
Longitudinal Studies Section, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.

Abstract

One of the strongest risk factors for dementia is the ε4 variant of the APOE gene. Yet, many who carry it never develop dementia. The current study examined for the first time whether positive age beliefs that are acquired from the culture may reduce the risk of developing dementia among older individuals, including those who are APOE ε4 carriers. The cohort consisted of 4,765 Health and Retirement Study participants who were aged 60 or older and dementia-free at baseline. As predicted, in the total sample those with positive age beliefs at baseline were significantly less likely to develop dementia, after adjusting for relevant covariates. Among those with APOE ε4, those with positive age beliefs were 49.8% less likely to develop dementia than those with negative age beliefs. The results of this study suggest that positive age beliefs, which are modifiable and have been found to reduce stress, can act as a protective factor, even for older individuals at high risk of dementia.

PMID:
29414991
PMCID:
PMC5802444
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0191004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center