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Pediatr Obes. 2018 Jun;13(6):381-388. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12262. Epub 2017 Dec 5.

Composition of gut microbiota in obese and normal-weight Mexican school-age children and its association with metabolic traits.

Author information

1
Unidad de Genómica de Poblaciones Aplicada a la Salud, Facultad de Química, UNAM/Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica (INMEGEN), Mexico City, Mexico.
2
Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT), Mexico City, Mexico.
3
Departamento de Inmunología, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología 'Ignacio Chávez', Mexico City, Mexico.
4
CIASaP, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacán, Mexico.
5
Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez, Mexico City, Mexico.
6
Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, UNAM/Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, Mexico City, Mexico.
7
Laboratorio de Errores Innatos del Metabolismo y Tamiz, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, Mexico City, Mexico.
8
Laboratorio de Genómica de Enfermedades Cardiovasculares, INMEGEN, Mexico City, Mexico.
9
Departamento de Microbiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Mexico.
10
Departamento de Endocrinología y Metabolismo, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición, Mexico City, Mexico.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Childhood obesity is a serious public health problem in Mexico. Adult gut microbiota composition has been linked to obesity, but few studies have addressed the role of gut microbiota in childhood obesity.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study is to compare gut microbiota composition in obese and normal-weight children and to associate gut microbiota profiles with amino acid serum levels and obesity-related metabolic traits.

METHODS:

Microbial taxa relative abundance was determined by 16S rRNA sequencing in 67 normal-weight and 71 obese children aged 6-12 years. Serum amino acid levels were measured by mass spectrometry. Associations between microbiota composition, metabolic parameters and amino acid serum levels were tested.

RESULTS:

No significant differences in phyla abundances or Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratios were observed between normal-weight and obese children. However, Bacteroides eggerthii abundance was significantly higher in obese children and correlated positively with body fat percentage and negatively with insoluble fibre intake. Additionally, Bacteroides plebeius and unclassified Christensenellaceae abundances were significantly higher in normal-weight children. Abundance of both these species correlated negatively with phenylalanine serum levels, a metabolite also found to be associated with obesity in Mexican children.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study identified bacterial species associated with obesity, metabolic complications and amino acid serum levels in Mexican children.

KEYWORDS:

Amino acids; Mexican children; gut microbiota; obesity

PMID:
29388394
DOI:
10.1111/ijpo.12262
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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