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Sci Rep. 2018 Jan 31;8(1):1931. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-20154-1.

A model species for agricultural pest genomics: the genome of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

Author information

1
Department of Entomology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, USA. sean.schoville@wisc.edu.
2
Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, USA.
3
Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
4
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, USA.
5
Department of Molecular Physiology, Christian-Albrechts-University at Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
6
Department of Biological Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, USA.
7
Department of Crop Protection, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
8
USDA-ARS National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD, USA.
9
USDA-ARS Bee Research Lab, Beltsville, MD, USA.
10
USDA-ARS Insect Genetics and Biochemistry Research Unit, Fargo, ND, USA.
11
Department of Entomology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, USA.
12
A.N. Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moskva, Russia.
13
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Amphoe Hat Yai, Thailand.
14
Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, USA.
15
Department of Genetics, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
16
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.
17
National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar, India.
18
Department of Biology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
19
Department of Biotechnology and Systems Biology, National Institute of Biology, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
20
Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.
21
Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, 13288, Marseille, France.
22
INRA, USC 1408 AFMB, F-13288, Marseille, France.
23
Department of Biological Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, King Abdulaziz, Saudi Arabia.
24
Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA.
25
Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, USA.
26
Department of Genetics & Molecular Biology in Botany, Christian-Albrechts-University at Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
27
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
28
Department of Entomology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.
29
Center for Data-Intensive Biomedicine and Biotechnology, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow, Russia.
30
Department of Biology, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, USA.
31
Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, USA.
32
Environmental Genomics and Systems Biology Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA.
33
USDA-ARS Center for Grain and Animal Health Research, New York, USA.
34
Institute for Developmental Biology, University of Cologne, Köln, Germany.
35
School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Campus, England, UK.
36
Department of Entomology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany.
37
INRA, Aix-Marseille Université, UMR1163, Biodiversité et Biotechnologie Fongiques, Marseille, France.
38
Department of Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA.
39
Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA.
40
Department of Biology and School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
41
Center for Autoimmune Genomics and Etiology, Division of Biomedical Informatics and Division of Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, USA.
42
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, USA.
43
Department of Entomology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, USA.
44
Center for Applied Plant Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, USA.

Abstract

The Colorado potato beetle is one of the most challenging agricultural pests to manage. It has shown a spectacular ability to adapt to a variety of solanaceaeous plants and variable climates during its global invasion, and, notably, to rapidly evolve insecticide resistance. To examine evidence of rapid evolutionary change, and to understand the genetic basis of herbivory and insecticide resistance, we tested for structural and functional genomic changes relative to other arthropod species using genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and community annotation. Two factors that might facilitate rapid evolutionary change include transposable elements, which comprise at least 17% of the genome and are rapidly evolving compared to other Coleoptera, and high levels of nucleotide diversity in rapidly growing pest populations. Adaptations to plant feeding are evident in gene expansions and differential expression of digestive enzymes in gut tissues, as well as expansions of gustatory receptors for bitter tasting. Surprisingly, the suite of genes involved in insecticide resistance is similar to other beetles. Finally, duplications in the RNAi pathway might explain why Leptinotarsa decemlineata has high sensitivity to dsRNA. The L. decemlineata genome provides opportunities to investigate a broad range of phenotypes and to develop sustainable methods to control this widely successful pest.

PMID:
29386578
PMCID:
PMC5792627
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-20154-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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