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CA Cancer J Clin. 2018 Jan;68(1):64-89. doi: 10.3322/caac.21441. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

Weight management and physical activity throughout the cancer care continuum.

Author information

1
Professor of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.
2
Professor of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA.
3
Vice President, Survivorship, American Cancer Society, Inc., Washington, DC.
4
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.
5
Professor of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute at the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
6
Professor of Health Promotion Sciences, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.
7
Associate Consulting Professor, Community and Family Medicine, Duke School of Medicine, Durham, NC.
8
Professor of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
9
Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS.
10
Associate Professor of Hematology/Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA.
11
Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
12
Chair, Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, George Washington University, Washington, DC.
13
Professor of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.
14
Professor of Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.
15
Professor of Cell Developmental and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.
16
Professor of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.
17
Professor of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.
18
CEO, Coeus Health, Chicago, IL.
19
Director, Prevention Research Coordination, Office of Disease Prevention, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
20
Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY.
21
Professor and Director, Cancer Prevention Research Centre, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
22
Vice President and National Health Officer, YMCA of the USA, Chicago, IL.
23
National Program Director for Weight Management, Veterans Health Administration, Durham, NC.
24
Professor of Oncology, Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC.
25
Senior Vice President, Research and Training Institute, Cancer Support Community, Philadelphia, PA.
26
Director, National Cancer Policy Forum and Board on Health Care Services, Health and Medicine Division, National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, Washington, DC.
27
Associate Director for Science, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
28
Senior Program Officer, National Cancer Policy Forum, Health and Medicine Division, National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, Washington, DC.
29
Senior Clinical Officer, Anthem Blue Cross Colorado, Denver, CO.
30
Chief Medical Advisor, Bipartisan Policy Center, Washington, DC.
31
Chief Medical Officer, Senior Vice President, Translation, Optum Labs, Cambridge, MA.
32
Professor of Physical Therapy, Wingate University, Wingate, NC.
33
Professor of Behavioral Science, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Abstract

Mounting evidence suggests that weight management and physical activity (PA) improve overall health and well being, and reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. Although many opportunities exist to include weight management and PA in routine cancer care, several barriers remain. This review summarizes key topics addressed in a recent National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine workshop entitled, "Incorporating Weight Management and Physical Activity Throughout the Cancer Care Continuum." Discussions related to body weight and PA among cancer survivors included: 1) current knowledge and gaps related to health outcomes; 2) effective intervention approaches; 3) addressing the needs of diverse populations of cancer survivors; 4) opportunities and challenges of workforce, care coordination, and technologies for program implementation; 5) models of care; and 6) program coverage. While more discoveries are still needed for the provision of optimal weight-management and PA programs for cancer survivors, obesity and inactivity currently jeopardize their overall health and quality of life. Actionable future directions are presented for research; practice and policy changes required to assure the availability of effective, affordable, and feasible weight management; and PA services for all cancer survivors as a part of their routine cancer care. CA Cancer J Clin 2018;68:64-89.

KEYWORDS:

nutrition; physical activity; supportive care; survivorship; weight management

PMID:
29165798
PMCID:
PMC5766382
[Available on 2019-01-01]
DOI:
10.3322/caac.21441
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