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BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 Nov 16;17(1):381. doi: 10.1186/s12884-017-1563-6.

Predictors of prenatal care satisfaction among pregnant women in American Samoa.

Author information

1
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Yale University, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT, 06520-8034, USA.
2
International Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, USA.
3
Lyndon B Johnson Tropical Medical Center, Pago Pago, American Samoa.
4
Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Chaminade University, Honolulu, USA.
5
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Yale University, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT, 06520-8034, USA. nicola.hawley@yale.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pregnant women in American Samoa have a high risk of complications due to overweight and obesity. Prenatal care can mitigate the risk, however many women do not seek adequate care during pregnancy. Low utilization of prenatal care may stem from low levels of satisfaction with services offered. Our objective was to identify predictors of prenatal care satisfaction in American Samoa.

METHODS:

A structured survey was distributed to 165 pregnant women receiving prenatal care at the Lyndon B Johnson Tropical Medical Center, Pago Pago. Women self-reported demographic characteristics, pregnancy history, and satisfaction with prenatal care. Domains of satisfaction were extracted using principal components analysis. Scores were summed across each domain. Linear regression was used to examine associations between maternal characteristics and the summed scores within individual domains and for overall satisfaction.

RESULT:

Three domains of satisfaction were identified: satisfaction with clinic services, clinic accessibility, and physician interactions. Waiting ≥ 2 h to see the doctor negatively impacted satisfaction with clinic services, clinic accessibility, and overall satisfaction. Living > 20 min from the clinic was associated with lower clinic accessibility, physician interactions, and overall satisfaction. Women who were employed/on maternity leave had lower scores for physician interactions compared with unemployed women/students. Women who did not attend all their appointments had lower overall satisfaction scores.

CONCLUSIONS:

Satisfaction with clinic services, clinic accessibility and physician interactions are important contributors to prenatal care satisfaction. To improve patient satisfaction prenatal care clinics should focus on making it easier for women to reach clinics, improving waiting times, and increasing time with providers.

KEYWORDS:

American Samoa; Clinic accessibility; Physician interactions; Prenatal care; Satisfaction

PMID:
29145810
PMCID:
PMC5689158
DOI:
10.1186/s12884-017-1563-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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