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Nat Commun. 2017 Nov 10;8(1):1402. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-01325-6.

Live imaging molecular changes in junctional tension upon VE-cadherin in zebrafish.

Author information

1
Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Genomics of Development and Disease division, The University of Queensland, 306 Carmody Road, St Lucia, 4072, QLD, Australia. a.lagendijk@imb.uq.edu.au.
2
Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine division, The University of Queensland, 306 Carmody Road, St Lucia, 4072, QLD, Australia.
3
Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology and the University of South Australia, Frome Road, Adelaide, 5000, SA, Australia.
4
Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Genomics of Development and Disease division, The University of Queensland, 306 Carmody Road, St Lucia, 4072, QLD, Australia.
5
Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, 2010, NSW, Australia.
6
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, 23284, USA.
7
Biozentrum der Universität Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 70, 4056, Basel, Switzerland.
8
Yale Cardiovascular Research Center and Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA.

Abstract

Forces play diverse roles in vascular development, homeostasis and disease. VE-cadherin at endothelial cell-cell junctions links the contractile acto-myosin cytoskeletons of adjacent cells, serving as a tension-transducer. To explore tensile changes across VE-cadherin in live zebrafish, we tailored an optical biosensor approach, originally established in vitro. We validate localization and function of a VE-cadherin tension sensor (TS) in vivo. Changes in tension across VE-cadherin observed using ratio-metric or lifetime FRET measurements reflect acto-myosin contractility within endothelial cells. Furthermore, we apply the TS to reveal biologically relevant changes in VE-cadherin tension that occur as the dorsal aorta matures and upon genetic and chemical perturbations during embryonic development.

PMID:
29123087
PMCID:
PMC5680264
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-017-01325-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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