Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes. 2018 Apr 1;4(2):98-105. doi: 10.1093/ehjqcco/qcx040.

Trends in acute pericarditis hospitalizations and outcomes among the elderly in the USA, 1999-2012.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.
2
Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale University, 1 Church Street, Suite 200, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
3
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, 622 W 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA.
4
Cardiology Research Foundation, 1700 Broadway, New York, NY 10019, USA.
5
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
6
University Cardiology, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Department, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Corso Bramante 88/90, Torino 10126, Italy.
7
Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, 330 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06519, USA.
8
Department of Health Policy and Management, Yale School of Public Health, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.

Abstract

Aims:

The elderly are at risk of pericarditis from conditions such as malignancy, renal disease, and after cardiac surgery. However, the burden of pericarditis and, especially, the long-term outcomes associated with pericarditis have not been described before among the elderly.

Methods and results:

We examined hospitalization rates; in-hospital, 30-day, and 1-year all-cause mortality rates; all-cause 30-day readmission rates; length of stay and health care expenditure for Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years or older with a principal discharge diagnosis of pericarditis from 1999 to 2012. A total of 45 504 hospitalizations were identified. The hospitalization rate for pericarditis remained stable at 26 per 100 000 person-years across the study period and was consistently higher among men and the oldest old. The adjusted all-cause 30-day mortality rates decreased from 7.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 6.9-8.2] in 1999 to 5.7% (95% CI 4.5-7.1) in 2012 and all-cause 1-year mortality rates decreased from 19.7% (95% CI 18.8-20.8) in 1999 to 17.3% (95% CI 15.3-20) in 2011 respectively. The 30-day all-cause readmission rate remained unchanged at 18% across the study period. The length of stay ranged from a mean of 5.8 days in 1999 to 5.5 days in 2012. The consumer price index adjusted cost per hospitalization increased from $8404 in 1999 to $9982 in 2012.

Conclusion:

The hospitalization rate for acute pericarditis has remained unchanged among older adults. Although mortality rates associated with pericarditis have improved, hospitalization for pericarditis continues to signal a high risk of dying within a year.

PMID:
29106473
PMCID:
PMC6279101
[Available on 2019-04-01]
DOI:
10.1093/ehjqcco/qcx040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center