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Soc Sci Med. 2017 Nov;192:30-35. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.09.027. Epub 2017 Sep 21.

Smoking concordance during pregnancy: Are there relationship benefits?

Author information

1
Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 06269, USA. Electronic address: tmc2184@cumc.columbia.edu.
2
Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Couples often engage in similar patterns of behavior, including substance use, and similarity may benefit relationship quality. Such relationship benefits may be especially salient for adolescent and young couples, whose relationships are often unstable and prone to breakups. This study examined the effect of mutual smoking during pregnancy on relationship quality in pregnant adolescent and young adult couples.

METHODS:

Couples (N = 228; MAgeFemale = 18.69; MAgeMale = 21.12) were recruited from obstetrics/gynecology clinics in Connecticut from July 2007 to February 2011. Couples completed measures of recent smoking and relationship quality (i.e. satisfaction, affectional expression, cohesion, and consensus) during pregnancy and at six months postpartum. Data were analyzed using multilevel models to account for interdependence within dyads.

RESULTS:

Discrepant smoking patterns were associated with a reduction in satisfaction and cohesion over time (B = -1.14, p = 0.03, and, B = -2.74, p = 0.03, respectively), and a reduction in consensus over time for female participants, B = -1.98, p = 0.07, but not for male participants, p = 0.51. Discrepant smoking was not related to affectional expression, p = 0.11.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results suggest relationship benefits concordant smoking patterns during pregnancy. Interventions should consider potential unintended relationship consequences of changing individual health behavior and instead work to develop couple-level health interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Concordance; Couples; Pregnancy; Relationship satisfaction; Smoking

PMID:
28957782
PMCID:
PMC5645258
DOI:
10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.09.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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