Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Health Serv Res. 2017 Sep 19. doi: 10.1111/1475-6773.12775. [Epub ahead of print]

Patterns of Collaboration among Health Care and Social Services Providers in Communities with Lower Health Care Utilization and Costs.

Author information

1
Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.
2
Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To understand how health care providers and social services providers coordinate their work in communities that achieve relatively low health care utilization and costs for older adults.

STUDY SETTING:

Sixteen Hospital Service Areas (HSAs) in the United States.

STUDY DESIGN:

We conducted a qualitative study of HSAs with performance in the top or bottom quartiles nationally across three key outcomes: ambulatory care sensitive hospitalizations, all-cause risk-standardized readmission rates, and average reimbursements per Medicare beneficiary. We selected 10 higher performing HSAs and six lower performing HSAs for inclusion in the study.

DATA COLLECTION:

To understand patterns of collaboration in each community, we conducted site visits and in-depth interviews with a total of 245 representatives of health care organizations, social service agencies, and local government bodies.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Organizations in higher performing communities regularly worked together to identify challenges faced by older adults in their areas and responded through collective action-in some cases, through relatively unstructured coalitions, and in other cases, through more hierarchical configurations. Further, hospitals in higher performing communities routinely matched patients with needed social services.

CONCLUSIONS:

The collaborative approaches used by higher performing communities, if spread, may be able to improve outcomes elsewhere.

KEYWORDS:

Social determinants of health; coordination; older adults

PMID:
28925041
DOI:
10.1111/1475-6773.12775
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center