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J Immunother Cancer. 2017 Sep 19;5(1):77. doi: 10.1186/s40425-017-0278-6.

Workshop on challenges, insights, and future directions for mouse and humanized models in cancer immunology and immunotherapy: a report from the associated programs of the 2016 annual meeting for the Society for Immunotherapy of cancer.

Author information

1
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA.
2
The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Farmington, CT, 06032, USA.
3
Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, 97239, USA.
4
Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA.
5
University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.
6
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA.
7
Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, 97239, USA.
8
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
9
Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA.
10
Department of Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.
11
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.
12
Yale School of Medicine, 15 York Street, St LMP 5031, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. marcus.bosenberg@yale.edu.

Abstract

Understanding how murine models can elucidate the mechanisms underlying antitumor immune responses and advance immune-based drug development is essential to advancing the field of cancer immunotherapy. The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) convened a workshop titled, "Challenges, Insights, and Future Directions for Mouse and Humanized Models in Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy" as part of the SITC 31st Annual Meeting and Associated Programs on November 10, 2016 in National Harbor, MD. The workshop focused on key issues in optimizing models for cancer immunotherapy research, with discussions on the strengths and weaknesses of current models, approaches to improve the predictive value of mouse models, and advances in cancer modeling that are anticipated in the near future. This full-day program provided an introduction to the most common immunocompetent and humanized models used in cancer immunology and immunotherapy research, and addressed the use of models to evaluate immune-targeting therapies. Here, we summarize the workshop presentations and subsequent panel discussion.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer immunotherapy; Humanized mouse; Immunocompetent; Mouse models; Mouse-in-mouse; Tumor microenvironment

PMID:
28923102
PMCID:
PMC5604351
DOI:
10.1186/s40425-017-0278-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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