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Cancer. 2018 Jan 1;124(1):161-166. doi: 10.1002/cncr.30975. Epub 2017 Sep 13.

Quality of life after surgery for intracranial meningioma.

Author information

1
Department of Biostatistics, Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
2
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
4
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.
5
Section of Epidemiology and Popular Sciences, Department of Medicine, Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
6
Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To the authors' knowledge, limited data exist regarding long-term quality of life (QOL) for patients diagnosed with intracranial meningioma.

METHODS:

The data in the current study concerned 1722 meningioma cases diagnosed among residents of Connecticut, Massachusetts, California, Texas, and North Carolina from May 1, 2006 through March 14, 2013, and 1622 controls who were frequency matched to the cases by age, sex, and geography. These individuals were participants in a large, population-based, case-control study. Telephone interviews were used to collect data regarding QOL at the time of initial diagnosis or contact, using the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 Health Survey. QOL outcomes were compared by case/control status.

RESULTS:

Patients diagnosed with meningioma reported levels of physical, emotional, and mental health functioning below those reported in a general healthy population. Case participants and controls differed most significantly with regard to the domains of Physical and Social Functioning, Role-Physical, Role-Emotional, and Vitality.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the current study, patients with meningioma experienced statistically significant decreases in QOL compared with healthy controls of a similar demographic breakdown, although these differences were found to vary in clinical significance. Cancer 2018;124:161-6. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

KEYWORDS:

Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36); brain tumors; case-control studies; meningioma; quality of life (QOL)

PMID:
28902404
DOI:
10.1002/cncr.30975
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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