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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 Sep;26(9):1470-1473. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-17-0367.

History of Comorbidities and Survival of Ovarian Cancer Patients, Results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

Author information

1
Deparment of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
2
Deparment of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.
3
Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
4
Independent Health, Buffalo, New York.
5
Department of Surgery, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
6
Department of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
7
Department of Immunology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
8
Center of Immunotherapy, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
9
Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, and University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
10
Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.
11
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Center, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
12
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
13
Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
14
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
15
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Comprehensive Cancer Center Erlangen-EMN, Erlangen University Hospital, Friedrich Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany.
16
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut.
17
Program in Epidemiology, Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
18
Department of Epidemiology, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth Medical, Hanover, New Hampshire.
19
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Cancer, Heidelberg, Germany.
20
University Cancer Center Hamburg (UCCH), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
21
Cancer Prevention and Control, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California.
22
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany.
23
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
24
Ovarian Cancer Center of Excellence, Women's Cancer Research Program, Magee-Womens Research Institute and University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
25
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
26
School of Public Health, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas.
27
Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan.
28
Department of Gynecological Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.
29
Women's Cancer Program at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California.
30
Department of Health Science Research, Division of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
31
Department of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
32
Department of Gynecology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
33
Department of Pathology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
34
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.
35
Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
36
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
37
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
38
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Trenton, New Jersey.
39
School of Public Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey.
40
Radboud University Medical Center, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
41
Department of Gynaecology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
42
Epidemiology Center, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.
43
Genetic Epidemiology Research Institute, UCI Center for Cancer Genetics Research & Prevention, School of Medicine, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California.
44
Department of Epidemiology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California.
45
Women's Cancer, Institute for Women's Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
46
Center for Cancer Prevention and Translational Genomics, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Los Angeles, California.
47
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California.
48
School of Women's and Children's Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
49
The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia.
50
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
51
Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California.
52
Deparment of Pathology and Laboratory Diagnostics, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland.
53
Deparment of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York. kirsten.moysich@roswellpark.org.

Abstract

Background: Comorbidities can affect survival of ovarian cancer patients by influencing treatment efficacy. However, little evidence exists on the association between individual concurrent comorbidities and prognosis in ovarian cancer patients.Methods: Among patients diagnosed with invasive ovarian carcinoma who participated in 23 studies included in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, we explored associations between histories of endometriosis; asthma; depression; osteoporosis; and autoimmune, gallbladder, kidney, liver, and neurological diseases and overall and progression-free survival. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age at diagnosis, stage of disease, histology, and study site, we estimated pooled HRs and 95% confidence intervals to assess associations between each comorbidity and ovarian cancer outcomes.Results: None of the comorbidities were associated with ovarian cancer outcome in the overall sample nor in strata defined by histologic subtype, weight status, age at diagnosis, or stage of disease (local/regional vs. advanced).Conclusions: Histories of endometriosis; asthma; depression; osteoporosis; and autoimmune, gallbladder, kidney, liver, or neurologic diseases were not associated with ovarian cancer overall or progression-free survival.Impact: These previously diagnosed chronic diseases do not appear to affect ovarian cancer prognosis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1470-3. ©2017 AACR.

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