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Surg Endosc. 2018 Feb;32(2):695-701. doi: 10.1007/s00464-017-5725-4. Epub 2017 Jul 19.

Assessing trends in laparoscopic colostomy reversal and evaluating outcomes when compared to open procedures.

Author information

1
Section of General Surgery, Trauma, and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, 330 Cedar Street, BB310, New Haven, CT, USA. Kevin.Pei@yale.edu.
2
Section of General Surgery, Trauma, and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, 330 Cedar Street, BB310, New Haven, CT, USA.
3
Section of Surgical Outcomes and Epidemiology, Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Laparoscopic colostomy reversal has emerged as a viable option for Hartmann's reversal but the trends in national adoption and postoperative complications are unknown. This study evaluates the practice trends for laparoscopic colostomy and compares complications, length of stay, and operative times between laparoscopic and open colostomy reversal.

METHODS:

All patients who had open or laparoscopic colostomy reversal surgery (current procedure codes: 44227 and 44626) between 2005 and 2014 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Data collected included patient demographics, comorbid conditions, postsurgical diagnosis, and estimated probabilities of morbidity and mortality. Univariate and multivariate unconditional logistic regression models and linear regression models were employed to evaluate the associations between various outcomes and surgical specialties.

RESULTS:

The reported volume of both open and laparoscopic colostomy reversal surgeries increased over time, but the percentage of open reversal surgery decreased from 100% in 2005 to 74.2% in 2014. The average annual increase in percentage of laparoscopic colostomy reversal surgery was 2.87%. The complication rates of open colostomy reversal surgery were significantly higher than the rates of laparoscopic colostomy reversal surgery (P < 0.0001). Although there were fluctuations, the complication rates remained constant over the 9-year study period for both open and laparoscopic colostomy reversal surgeries. The total hospital length of stay among patients who had laparoscopic colostomy reversal surgery was shorter compared to patients who had open colostomy reversal surgery [mean change (MC) = -1.77 days, P < 0.0001]. Similarly, a shorter operation time was also observed for patients who had laparoscopic colostomy reversal surgery (MC = -26.48 min, P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

Based on the NSQIP database, laparoscopic colostomy reversal is increasing steadily year over year from 2005 to 2014 in NSQIP participating hospitals. Overall complication rates and length of stay are significantly lower and sustained throughout the study period for laparoscopic reversal.

KEYWORDS:

Colostomy; Laparoscopy; Quality improvement

PMID:
28726139
DOI:
10.1007/s00464-017-5725-4

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