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Oral Oncol. 2017 Aug;71:129-137. doi: 10.1016/j.oraloncology.2017.06.013. Epub 2017 Jun 23.

Treatment guidelines and patterns of care in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Primary surgical resection vs. nonsurgical treatment.

Author information

1
Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (Otolaryngology), New Haven, CT, United States.
2
Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, United States; Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, United States.
3
Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, United States; Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, United States.
4
Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (Otolaryngology), New Haven, CT, United States; Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, United States.
5
Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (Otolaryngology), New Haven, CT, United States; Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, United States; Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, United States.
6
Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (Otolaryngology), New Haven, CT, United States; Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, United States. Electronic address: saral.mehra@yale.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The 2017 National Comprehensive Cancer Network Clinical Practice Guidelines recommend surgical resection or definitive radiation therapy for early-stage oral cavity malignancies, and surgical resection or multimodality clinical trials for late-stage disease. Few studies have been conducted to identify predictors of choice of treatment modality for oral cavity malignancies.

METHODS:

All patients in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) diagnosed with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) between 1998 and 2011 were identified. Chi-square and binary logistic regression were used to identify factors predictive of surgical or nonsurgical treatment; multiple imputation was used for missing data. Cox proportional hazards models were generated to identify associations between treatment modality and overall survival (OS).

RESULTS:

Of 23,459 patients, 4139 (17.6%) underwent primary nonsurgical treatment. Among NCDB-registered facilities, there has been a decrease in use of nonsurgical treatment for OCSCC (OR 0.97, p<0.001). Older age, non-white race, Medicaid insurance, low income, low education, and later-stage disease were associated with nonsurgical therapy, while patients at academic/research programs were more likely to undergo surgery (OR 0.38, p<0.001). Nonsurgical treatment was associated with decreased OS (HR=2.02, p<0.001); this was upheld on subgroup analysis of early- and late-stage disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of primary nonsurgical treatment for OCSCC has decreased over time among NCDB-registered facilities and is associated with factors related to access to care. Surgical resection for the primary treatment of oral cavity cancer may be associated with improved OS, though conclusions regarding survival are limited by the non-randomized nature of the data.

KEYWORDS:

Guideline adherence; Health services; Oral cancer; Quality of care; Squamous cell carcinoma

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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