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Biochem Soc Trans. 2017 Aug 15;45(4):871-884. doi: 10.1042/BST20160183. Epub 2017 Jul 3.

The sweet tooth of the circadian clock.

Fu M1,2, Yang X3,2,4.

Author information

1
Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
2
Department of Comparative Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
3
Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, U.S.A. xiaoyong.yang@yale.edu.
4
Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.

Abstract

The endogenous circadian clock is a key regulator of daily metabolic processes. On the other hand, circadian clocks in a broad range of tissues can be tuned by extrinsic and intrinsic metabolic cues. The bidirectional interaction between circadian clocks and metabolism involves both transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Nuclear receptors exemplify the transcriptional programs that couple molecular clocks to metabolism. The post-translational modifications of the core clock machinery are known to play a key role in metabolic entrainment of circadian clocks. O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification (O-GlcNAcylation) of intracellular proteins is a key mediator of metabolic response to nutrient availability. This review highlights our current understanding of the role of protein O-GlcNAcylation in mediating metabolic input and output of the circadian clock.

KEYWORDS:

O-GlcNAc; circadian clock; metabolism; post-translational modification

PMID:
28673939
DOI:
10.1042/BST20160183
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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