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Curr Biol. 2017 Jul 10;27(13):1915-1927.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2017.05.089. Epub 2017 Jun 29.

A Peptidergic Circuit Links the Circadian Clock to Locomotor Activity.

Author information

1
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
2
Department of Biology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL 60660, USA.
3
Department of Psychological Sciences, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA 92110, USA.
4
Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Genetics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Kavli Institute for Neuroscience, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
5
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address: amita@mail.med.upenn.edu.

Abstract

The mechanisms by which clock neurons in the Drosophila brain confer an ∼24-hr rhythm onto locomotor activity are unclear, but involve the neuropeptide diuretic hormone 44 (DH44), an ortholog of corticotropin-releasing factor. Here we identified DH44 receptor 1 as the relevant receptor for rest:activity rhythms and mapped its site of action to hugin-expressing neurons in the subesophageal zone (SEZ). We traced a circuit that extends from Dh44-expressing neurons in the pars intercerebralis (PI) through hugin+ SEZ neurons to the ventral nerve cord. Hugin neuropeptide, a neuromedin U ortholog, also regulates behavioral rhythms. The DH44 PI-Hugin SEZ circuit controls circadian locomotor activity in a daily cycle but has minimal effect on feeding rhythms, suggesting that the circadian drive to feed can be separated from circadian locomotion. These findings define a linear peptidergic circuit that links the clock to motor outputs to modulate circadian control of locomotor activity.

KEYWORDS:

DH44; Drosophila; Hugin; behavior; circadian rhythms; circuits; feeding; locomotion

PMID:
28669757
DOI:
10.1016/j.cub.2017.05.089
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