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Nurse Educ Today. 2017 Sep;56:41-46. doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.06.003. Epub 2017 Jun 19.

Flipping around the classroom: Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing students' satisfaction and achievement.

Author information

1
The George Washington University, School of Nursing, 45085 University Drive, Innovation Hall, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA. Electronic address: melbanna@gwu.edu.
2
The George Washington University, School of Nursing, 45085 University Drive, Innovation Hall, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA. Electronic address: mlw7b@gwu.edu.
3
The George Washington University, School of Nursing, 1919 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20006, USA. Electronic address: angelamcnelis@gwu.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The flipped classroom approach is based on shared responsibility for learning by students and teachers, and empowers students to take an active role in the learning process. While utilization of this approach has resulted in higher exam scores compared to traditional approaches in prior studies, the flipped classroom has not included learners in Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) programs.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine differences on exam scores and satisfaction of teaching between a 3-week flipped and traditional classroom approach.

DESIGN:

Mixed methods, crossover repeated measures design.

SETTINGS:

Private school of nursing located in the eastern United States.

PARTICIPANTS:

76 ABSN students.

METHODS:

Two separate sections of a Pharmacology course received either 3-weeks of flipped or traditional classroom during Period 1, then switched approaches during Period 2. Two exam scores measuring knowledge and a questionnaire assessing satisfaction of teaching were collected. Focus groups were conducted to learn about students' experience in the flipped classroom. Descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and stepwise linear mixed model were used to analyze quantitative data. Focus group data were transcribed, coded, and categorized in themes.

RESULTS:

Students in the flipped classroom achieved significantly higher scores on the first Pharmacology exam than students in the traditional classroom, but there was no significant difference on the second exam. Three themes emerged from focus groups on student perception of integrating the flipped approach: don't fix what isn't broken; treat me as an adult; and remember the work is overwhelming.

CONCLUSIONS:

Both traditional and flipped classroom approaches successfully prepared students for the Pharmacology exams. While results support the use of the flipped approach, judicious use of this instructional pedagogy with dense or difficult content, particularly in accelerated programs, is recommended. Instructors should also provide students with enough information and rationale for using the flipped classroom approach.

KEYWORDS:

Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN); Active learning; Flipped classroom; Innovative pedagogical approaches

PMID:
28654815
DOI:
10.1016/j.nedt.2017.06.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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