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Gen Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2017 Oct;65(10):557-565. doi: 10.1007/s11748-017-0789-6. Epub 2017 Jun 13.

Risk assessment and outcomes of vasoplegia after cardiac surgery.

Author information

1
Section of Cardiac Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. athtsiouris@hotmail.com.
2
Cardiothoracic Surgery, Providence Medical Center, 8919 Parallel Parkway, East Tower, Suite 580, Kansas City, KS, 66112, USA. athtsiouris@hotmail.com.
3
Section of Cardiac Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to analyze risk factors and outcomes of vasoplegia after cardiac surgery based on our experience with almost 2000 cardiac operations performed at our institution.

METHODS:

We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) between 2011 and 2013. Data were available for a total of 1992 patients. We defined vasoplegia as hypotension with persistently low systemic vascular resistance (<800 dyn/s/cm) and preserved Cardiac Index (>2.5).

RESULTS:

The rate of vasoplegia in our cohort was 20.3% (n = 405). The incidences of mild, moderate, and severe vasoplegia were 13.2, 5.7, and 1.5%, respectively. Factors that increased risk of vasoplegia included valve operations, heart transplants, dialysis-dependent renal failure, age >65, diuretic therapy, and recent myocardial infarction. B blocker therapy was protective against vasoplegia.

CONCLUSION:

Vasoplegic syndrome is still a frequently occurring adverse event following cardiac surgery. In high risk patients for vasoplegia, it may be sensible to proceed with preoperative volume loading (instead of diuresis), initiation of low dose vasopressin therapy if needed, and attempting to up titrate beta-blocker therapy.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiac surgery; Outcomes; Risk stratification; Vasoplegia

PMID:
28612323
DOI:
10.1007/s11748-017-0789-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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