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Health Aff (Millwood). 2017 Jun 1;36(6):1065-1069. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2016.1416.

For Selected Services, Blacks And Hispanics More Likely To Receive Low-Value Care Than Whites.

Author information

1
William L. Schpero (william.schpero@yale.edu) is a PhD student in the Department of Health Policy and Management, Yale School of Public Health, in New Haven, Connecticut.
2
Nancy E. Morden is an associate professor of community and family medicine at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, in Lebanon, New Hampshire.
3
Thomas D. Sequist is an associate professor of medicine and health care policy at Harvard Medical School, in Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Meredith B. Rosenthal is a professor of health economics and policy in the Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston.
5
Daniel J. Gottlieb is a research associate at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth.
6
Carrie H. Colla is an associate professor at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth.

Abstract

US minority populations receive fewer effective health services than whites. Using Medicare administrative data for 2006-11, we found no consistent, corresponding protection against the receipt of ineffective health services. Compared with whites, blacks and Hispanics were often more likely to receive the low-value services studied.

KEYWORDS:

Disparities; Health Reform; Medicare; Minority Health; Quality Of Care

PMID:
28583965
PMCID:
PMC5568010
DOI:
10.1377/hlthaff.2016.1416
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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