Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Infect Dis. 2017 Oct 15;65(8):1289-1297. doi: 10.1093/cid/cix468.

Influenza Vaccination Modifies Disease Severity Among Community-dwelling Adults Hospitalized With Influenza.

Author information

1
Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
2
Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Georgia.
4
Maryland Emerging Infections Program, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.
5
Salt Lake County Health Department, Utah, Salt Lake City.
6
Emerging Infections Program, New York State Department of Public Health, Albany.
7
Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York.
8
California Emerging Infections Program, Oakland.
9
New Mexico Emerging Infections Program, New Mexico Department of Health, Santa Fe.
10
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver.
11
Connectitut Emerging Infections Program, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven.
12
Ohio Department of Health, Columbus.
13
Michigan Department of Community Health, Lansing.
14
Minnesota Department of Health, St Paul.
15
Oregon Public Health Division, Portland.
16
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.

Abstract

Background:

We investigated the effect of influenza vaccination on disease severity in adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza during 2013-14, a season in which vaccine viruses were antigenically similar to those circulating.

Methods:

We analyzed data from the 2013-14 influenza season and used propensity score matching to account for the probability of vaccination within age strata (18-49, 50-64, and ≥65 years). Death, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and hospital and ICU lengths of stay (LOS) were outcome measures for severity. Multivariable logistic regression and competing risk models were used to compare disease severity between vaccinated and unvaccinated patients, adjusting for timing of antiviral treatment and time from illness onset to hospitalization.

Results:

Influenza vaccination was associated with a reduction in the odds of in-hospital death among patients aged 18-49 years (adjusted odds ratios [aOR] = 0.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05 to 0.97), 50-64 years (aOR = 0.48; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.97), and ≥65 years (aOR = 0.39; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.66). Vaccination also reduced ICU admission among patients aged 18-49 years (aOR = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.93) and ≥65 years (aOR = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.81), and shortened ICU LOS among those 50-64 years (adjusted relative hazards [aRH] = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.74) and ≥65 years (aRH = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.73), and hospital LOS among 50-64 years (aRH = 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.26) and ≥65 years (aRH = 1.24; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.37).

Conclusions:

Influenza vaccination during 2013-14 influenza season attenuated adverse outcome among adults that were hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza.

KEYWORDS:

Influenza vaccination; adults; disease severity

PMID:
28525597
PMCID:
PMC5718038
DOI:
10.1093/cid/cix468
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center