Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Cancer. 2017 Jun 6;116(12):1627-1637. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2017.120. Epub 2017 May 2.

Pre-diagnosis diet and survival after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

Author information

1
Yale School of Public Health, Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale University, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
2
Gynaecological Cancers Group, QIMR Berghofer Institute of Medical Research, 300 Herston Road, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia.
3
School of Public Health, University of Queensland Public Health Building, Herston Road, Queensland 4006, Australia.
4
Department of Gynaecological Oncology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia.
5
Lifehouse Gynaecologic Oncology Group, Lifehouse, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia.
6
Mercy Hospital for Women, Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Studley Road, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084, Australia.
7
Oncology/Dysplasia Unit, The Royal Women's Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia.
8
Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Butterfield Street, Herston, Queensland 4029, Australia.
9
School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia.
10
Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
11
U.S. Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The relationship between diet and survival after ovarian cancer diagnosis is unclear as a result of a limited number of studies and inconsistent findings.

METHODS:

We examined the association between pre-diagnostic diet and overall survival in a population-based cohort (n=811) of Australian women diagnosed with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer between 2002 and 2005. Diet was measured by validated food frequency questionnaire. Deaths were ascertained up to 31 August 2014 via medical record review and Australian National Death Index linkage. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, controlling for diagnosis age, tumour stage, grade and subtype, residual disease, smoking status, body mass index, physical activity, marital status, and energy intake.

RESULTS:

We observed improved survival with highest compared with lowest quartile of fibre intake (hazard ratio (HR)=0.69, 95% CI: 0.53-0.90, P-trend=0.002). There was a suggestion of better survival for women with highest compared with lowest intake category of green leafy vegetables (HR=0.79, 95% CI: 0.62-0.99), fish (HR=0.74, 95% CI: 0.57-0.95), poly- to mono-unsaturated fat ratio (HR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.59-0.98), and worse survival with higher glycaemic index (HR=1.28, 95% CI: 1.01-1.65, P-trend=0.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

The associations we observed between healthy components of diet pre-diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival raise the possibility that dietary choices after diagnosis may improve survival.

PMID:
28463959
PMCID:
PMC5518850
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2017.120
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center