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J Patient Exp. 2017 Mar 1;4(1):28-36. doi: 10.1177/2374373517694533. Epub 2017 Feb 20.

House staff communication training and patient experience scores.

Author information

1
Yale School of Public Health, New Haven CT 06520, USA.
2
Department of Urology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Yale-New Haven Hospital, 20 York Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
3
Yale-New Haven Hospital, 20 York Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Department of Neurosurgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
4
Yale-New Haven Hospital, 20 York Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Department of Neurology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
5
Yale-New Haven Hospital, 20 York Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
6
Yale-New Haven Hospital, 20 York Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, CT 06520, USA.
7
Teaching and Learning Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether communication training for housestaff via role-playing exercises (1) is well-received and (2) improves patient experience scores in housestaff clinics.

METHODS:

We conducted a pre-post study in which the housestaff for 3 adult hospital departments participated in communication trainingled by trained faculty in small groups . Sessions centered on a published 5-step strategy for opening patient-centered interviews using department-specific role-playing exercises. Housestaff completed post-training questionnaires. For one month prior to and one month following the training, patients in the housestaff clinics completed surveys with CG-CAHPS questions regarding physician communication, immediately following clinic visits. Pre-and post -intervention results for top-box scores were compared.

RESULTS:

Forty -four of a possible 45 housestaff (97.8%) participated, with 31 (70.5%) indicating that the role-playing exercise increased their perception of the 5-step strategy. No differences on patient responses to CG-CAHPS questions were seen when comparing 63 pre-intervention patients surveys to 77 post-intervention surveys.

CONCLUSION:

Demonstrating an improvement in standard patient experience surveys in resident clinics may require ongoing communication coaching and investigation of the "hidden curriculum" of training.

KEYWORDS:

Communication; education; medical residencies; patient satisfaction

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of competing interests The authors declare that there are no conflicts of interest.

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