Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Cancer. 2017 Apr 25;116(9):1223-1228. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2017.68. Epub 2017 Mar 28.

Use of common analgesic medications and ovarian cancer survival: results from a pooled analysis in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

Author information

1
Gynaecological Cancers Group, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, 300 Herston Road, Brisbane, Queensland 4006, Australia.
2
The University of Queensland, School of Public Health, Level 2 Public Health Building (887), Corner of Herston Road & Wyndham Street, Brisbane, Queensland 4006, Australia.
3
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-9774, USA.
4
Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 2525 West End Avenue, Nashville, TN 37203, USA.
5
Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Suite 602, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
6
Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Duke Cancer Institute, DUMC Box 3917, 10 Bryan Searle Drive, Seeley Mudd Building, 2nd floor, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
7
Department of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA.
8
Centre for Cancer Research, the Westmead Institute for Medical Research, The University of Sydney, 176 Hawkesbury Road, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia.
9
Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Westmead Hospital, Cnr Hawkesbury Road and Darcy Road, Sydney, New South Wales 2145, Australia.
10
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, LEPH 413, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
11
Program in Epidemiology, Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109-1024, USA.
12
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Health Sciences Bldg, F-262, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
13
Department of Epidemiology, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, 1 Medical Center Drive, 7927 Rubin Building, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA.
14
Cancer Prevention and Control, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA.
15
Community and Population Health Research Institute, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA.
16
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
17
Ovarian Cancer Center of Excellence, Women's Cancer Research Program, Magee-Women's Research Institute and University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, 204 Craft Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
18
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, 130 De Soto Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.
19
The University of Texas School of Public Health, 1200 Herman Pressler, Suite W130, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
20
Department of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, Copenhagen Ø DK-2100, Denmark.
21
Department of Gynaecology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, Copenhagen Ø DK-2100, Denmark.
22
Molecular Unit, Department of Pathology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Ringvej 75, Herlev DK-2370, Denmark.
23
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, 25171 Morris Bldg, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
24
Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, Richardson Fuller Building, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
25
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
26
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
27
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA.
28
Rutgers School of Public Health, 683 Hoes Lane West, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA.
29
Cancer Surveillance Research Program, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA.
30
Department of Epidemiology, University of California Irvine, 224 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-7550, USA.
31
Genetic Epidemiology Research Institute, UCI Center for Cancer Genetics Research & Prevention, School of Medicine, University of California Irvine, 224 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-7550, USA.
32
Women's Cancer, Institute for Women's Health, University College London, Maple House 1st Floor, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London W1T 7DN, UK.
33
Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.
34
School of Women's and Children's Health, University of New South Wales, Level 1, Women's Health Institute, Royal Hospital for Women, Barker Street, Randwick, New South Wales 2031, Australia.
35
The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, New South Wales 2010, Australia.
36
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, SPH Tower, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA.
37
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 307 East 63rd Street, New York, NY 10065, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with improved survival in some cancers, but evidence for ovarian cancer is limited.

METHODS:

Pooling individual-level data from 12 Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium studies, we evaluated the association between self-reported, pre-diagnosis use of common analgesics and overall/progression-free/disease-specific survival among 7694 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (4273 deaths).

RESULTS:

Regular analgesic use (at least once per week) was not associated with overall survival (pooled hazard ratios, pHRs (95% confidence intervals): aspirin 0.96 (0.88-1.04); non-aspirin NSAIDs 0.97 (0.89-1.05); acetaminophen 1.01 (0.93-1.10)), nor with progression-free/disease-specific survival. There was however a survival advantage for users of any NSAIDs in studies clearly defining non-use as less than once per week (pHR=0.89 (0.82-0.98)).

CONCLUSIONS:

Although this study did not show a clear association between analgesic use and ovarian cancer survival, further investigation with clearer definitions of use and information about post-diagnosis use is warranted.

PMID:
28350790
PMCID:
PMC5418444
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2017.68
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Publication type, MeSH terms, Substances, Grant support

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center