Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Biol Psychol. 2017 Mar 6;125:115-120. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2017.03.002. [Epub ahead of print]

Anxiety and neural responses to infant and adult faces during pregnancy.

Author information

1
Yale Child Study Center, Yale University, 230 South Frontage Road, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: helena.rutherford@yale.edu.
2
Yale Child Study Center, Yale University, 230 South Frontage Road, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

Abstract

Women are vulnerable to anxiety during pregnancy and postpartum. However, little is known about antenatal anxiety and neural processing of infant-relevant information. In this experiment, the N170, P300, and LPP (late positive potential) event-related potentials were measured from 43 pregnant women as they viewed infant and adult faces, which were either neutral or distressed in expression. Mother's self-reported anxiety levels were also assessed. The N170 was comparable across face conditions and was not associated with anxiety. However, our central finding was that greater levels of antenatal anxiety were associated with a larger LPP, but only for neutral infant faces. Results suggest that antenatal anxiety may result in deeper processing of neutral, emotionally ambiguous, infant faces during pregnancy. These findings are discussed in light of other work indicating an interpretive bias toward threat in response to neutral stimuli in anxiety.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; EEG/ERP; Face perception; Pregnancy

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center