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J Immunol. 2017 Apr 15;198(8):3029-3032. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1601824. Epub 2017 Mar 6.

Cutting Edge: Fetal/Placental Type I IFN Can Affect Maternal Survival and Fetal Viral Load during Viral Infection.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520.
2
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Women's Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-749, Korea; and.
5
Perinatology Research Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Detroit, MI 48201.
6
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520; gil.mor@yale.edu.

Abstract

Pregnant women have greater mortality and complications associated with viral infections compared with the general population, but the reason for the increased susceptibility is not well defined. Placenta type I IFN is an important immune modulator and protects the pregnancy. We hypothesized that loss of placental IFN affects the regulation of the maternal immune system, resulting in the differential response to infections observed in pregnancy. Pregnant mice lacking the IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR) became viremic and had higher mortality compared with nonpregnant animals. Notably, an embryo with functional IFN signaling alone was sufficient to rescue the pregnant IFNAR-/- dam from virus-associated demise. Placental IFN was also an important regulator of viral replication in placental tissue and significantly affected viral transmission to the fetus. These findings highlight the role of fetal/placental IFN in the modulation of viral infection in the mother and fetus.

PMID:
28264970
PMCID:
PMC5633930
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.1601824
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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