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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 Jul;65(7):1427-1433. doi: 10.1111/jgs.14804. Epub 2017 Feb 21.

Effect of Physical Activity versus Health Education on Physical Function, Grip Strength and Mobility.

Author information

1
Center for Aging and Population Health, Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
2
Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
3
Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.
4
Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
7
School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California.
8
Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
9
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
10
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.
11
Translational Research Institute for Metabolism and Diabetes, Florida Hospital, Sanford Burnham, Orlando, Florida.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Physical activity (PA) reduces the rate of mobility disability, compared with health education (HE), in at risk older adults. It is important to understand aspects of performance contributing to this benefit.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate intervention effects on tertiary physical performance outcomes.

DESIGN:

The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) was a multi-centered, single-blind randomized trial of older adults.

SETTING:

Eight field centers throughout the United States.

PARTICIPANTS:

1635 adults aged 78.9 ± 5.2 years, 67.2% women at risk for mobility disability (Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB] <10).

INTERVENTIONS:

Moderate PA including walking, resistance and balance training compared with HE consisting of topics relevant to older adults.

OUTCOMES:

Grip strength, SPPB score and its components (balance, 4 m gait speed, and chair-stands), as well as 400 m walking speed.

RESULTS:

Total SPPB score was higher in PA versus HE across all follow-up times (overall P = .04) as was the chair-stand component (overall P < .001). No intervention effects were observed for balance (overall P = .12), 4 m gait speed (overall P = .78), or grip strength (overall P = .62). However, 400 m walking speed was faster in PA versus HE group (overall P =<.001). In separate models, 29% of the rate reduction of major mobility disability in the PA versus HE group was explained by change in SPPB score, while 39% was explained by change in the chair stand component.

CONCLUSION:

Lower extremity performance (SPPB) was significantly higher in the PA compared with HE group. Changes in chair-stand score explained a considerable portion of the effect of PA on the reduction of major mobility disability-consistent with the idea that preserving muscle strength/power may be important for the prevention of major mobility disability.

KEYWORDS:

gait speed; physical activity; physical function; randomized clinical trial

PMID:
28221668
PMCID:
PMC5507738
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.14804
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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