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AIDS Behav. 2017 Oct;21(10):2945-2957. doi: 10.1007/s10461-017-1722-9.

Gender Differences in HIV Risk Behaviors Among Persons Involved in the U.S. Criminal Justice System and Living with HIV or at Risk for HIV: A "Seek, Test, Treat, and Retain" Harmonization Consortium.

Author information

1
Yale University AIDS Program, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. kelsey.loeliger@yale.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA. kelsey.loeliger@yale.edu.
3
Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA.
5
Department of Medicine/Infectious Diseases, The Miriam Hospital/Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, Washington, DC, USA.
7
Friends Research Institute Inc., Baltimore, MD, USA.
8
Yale University AIDS Program, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
9
Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.
10
Centre of Excellence on Research in AIDS (CERiA), University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
11
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
12
Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
13
Department of Health Policy and Management, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
14
Division of Infectious Diseases, Immunology and International Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract

The U.S. female criminal justice (CJ) population is rapidly growing, yet large-scale studies exploring gender-specific HIV risk behaviors in the CJ population are lacking. This analysis uses baseline data on adults with a CJ history from eight U.S. studies in an NIH-funded "Seek, Test, Treat, Retain" harmonization consortium. Data were collected using a standardized HIV risk behavior assessment tool and pooled across studies to describe participants' characteristics and risk behaviors. Multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to test for gender-based behavior differences. Among 784 HIV-positive (21.4% female) and 5521 HIV-negative (8.5% female) participants, HIV-positive women had higher odds than HIV-positive men of engaging in condomless sexual intercourse (AOR 1.84 [1.16-2.95]) with potentially sero-discordant partners (AOR 2.40 [1.41-4.09]) and of sharing injection equipment (AOR 3.36 [1.31-8.63]). HIV risk reduction interventions targeting CJ-involved women with HIV are urgently needed as this population may represent an under-recognized potential source of HIV transmission.

KEYWORDS:

Criminal justice system; HIV/AIDS; Injection drug use risk behaviors; Sexual risk behaviors; Women and gender differences

PMID:
28188460
PMCID:
PMC5552433
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-017-1722-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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