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Glob Health Action. 2015 Jan;8(1):26537. doi: 10.3402/gha.v8.26537.

Towards reframing health service delivery in Uganda: the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of Non-Communicable Diseases.

Author information

1
a Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of Non-Communicable Diseases , Kampala , Uganda.
2
b Section of General Internal Medicine Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven , CT , USA.
3
c Global Health Corps , New York , NY , USA.
4
d Department of Community Health Government of Uganda Ministry of Health , Kampala , Uganda.
5
e Mulago National Referral Hospital Kampala , Uganda.
6
f Yale Global Health Leadership Institute New Haven , CT , USA.
7
g Department of Medicine Makerere University College of Health Sciences , Kampala , Uganda.

Abstract

Background The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is accelerating. Given that the capacity of health systems in LMICs is already strained by the weight of communicable diseases, these countries find themselves facing a double burden of disease. NCDs contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality, thereby playing a major role in the cycle of poverty, and impeding development. Methods Integrated approaches to health service delivery and healthcare worker (HCW) training will be necessary in order to successfully combat the great challenge posed by NCDs. Results In 2013, we formed the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of NCDs (UINCD), a multidisciplinary research collaboration that aims to present a systems approach to integrated management of chronic disease prevention, care, and the training of HCWs. Discussion Through broad-based stakeholder engagement, catalytic partnerships, and a collective vision, UINCD is working to reframe integrated health service delivery in Uganda.

KEYWORDS:

Health system strengthening; Integration; Multi-sectoral collaboration; Non-communicable diseases

PMID:
28156719
DOI:
10.3402/gha.v8.26537
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