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J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Jul;31(7):1223-1228. doi: 10.1111/jdv.14138. Epub 2017 Feb 21.

Predictors of tanning dependence in white non-Hispanic females and males.

Author information

1
Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.
2
Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, USA.
3
Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Growing evidence suggests that some individuals may exhibit symptoms of dependence on ultraviolet (UV) light, a known carcinogen, in the context of tanning; however, few studies have investigated predictors of tanning dependence (TD).

OBJECTIVE:

To identify predictors of TD.

METHODS:

Non-Hispanics of European ancestry who had previously participated in a case-control study of early-onset basal cell carcinoma completed an online survey to ascertain TD and other behaviours (alcohol dependence, nicotine dependence, seasonal affective disorder (SAD), exercise 'addiction' and depression). Information on host factors, such as skin and eye colour and history of sunbathing and indoor tanning, was obtained from a study in which the participants were previously enrolled. Lifetime TD was assessed using the modified Cut down, Annoyed, Guilty, Eye-opener (mCAGE) and the modified Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (mDSM-IV-TR) questionnaires. Participants were classified as 'TD' if positive on both questionnaires and not TD if negative on both questionnaires.

RESULTS:

In total, 499 individuals completed the online survey (81.9% participation rate), and 24.4% were classified as 'TD'. In the multivariate model, women were more likely to be TD [odds ratio (OR) 6.93; 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) (3.36-14.27)] than men. Alcohol dependence (OR 6.55: 95% CI 3.19-13.42), SAD (OR 2.77; 95% CI 1.26-6.09) and exercise 'addiction' (OR 5.47; 95% CI 1.15-26.06) were all significant predictors for TD.

CONCLUSION:

Increased knowledge of those at risk for TD will allow appropriate interventions to be designed.

PMID:
28129487
PMCID:
PMC5522341
DOI:
10.1111/jdv.14138
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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