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Am J Ind Med. 2017 Feb;60(2):189-197. doi: 10.1002/ajim.22679.

Evaluating predictors of lead exposure for activities disturbing materials painted with or containing lead using historic published data from U.S. workplaces.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.
2
Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
3
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, International St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University, Incheon, Korea.
4
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Biostatistics Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We evaluated predictors of differences in published occupational lead concentrations for activities disturbing material painted with or containing lead in U.S. workplaces to aid historical exposure reconstruction.

METHODS:

For the aforementioned tasks, 221 air and 113 blood lead summary results (1960-2010) were extracted from a previously developed database. Differences in the natural log-transformed geometric mean (GM) for year, industry, job, and other ancillary variables were evaluated in meta-regression models that weighted each summary result by its inverse variance and sample size.

RESULTS:

Air and blood lead GMs declined 5%/year and 6%/year, respectively, in most industries. Exposure contrast in the GMs across the nine jobs and five industries was higher based on air versus blood concentrations. For welding activities, blood lead GMs were 1.7 times higher in worst-case versus non-worst case scenarios.

CONCLUSIONS:

Job, industry, and time-specific exposure differences were identified; other determinants were too sparse or collinear to characterize. Am. J. Ind. Med. 60:189-197, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

exposure determinants; lead; meta-regression; occupational exposure; population-based studies

PMID:
28079279
PMCID:
PMC5261829
DOI:
10.1002/ajim.22679
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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