Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Neurosci Lett. 2017 Jun 23;652:25-34. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2016.12.002. Epub 2016 Dec 19.

Rewiring the spinal cord: Direct and indirect strategies.

Author information

1
Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration & Repair, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06536, USA.
2
Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration & Repair, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06536, USA. Electronic address: stephen.strittmatter@yale.edu.

Abstract

Spinal cord injury is currently incurable. Treatment is limited to minimizing secondary complications and maximizing residual function by rehabilitation. Neurologic recovery is prevented by the poor intrinsic regenerative capacity of neurons in the adult central nervous system and by the presence of growth inhibitors in the adult brain and spinal cord. Here we identify three approaches to rewire the spinal cord after injury: axonal regeneration (direct endogenous reconnection), axonal sprouting (indirect endogenous reconnection) and neural stem cell transplantation (indirect exogenous reconnection). Regeneration and sprouting of axonal fibers can be both enhanced through the neutralization of myelin- and extracellular matrix-associated inhibitors described in the first part of this review. Alternatively, in the second part we focus on the formation of a novel circuit through the grafting of neural stem cells in the lesion site. Transplanted neural stem cells differentiate in vivo into neurons and glial cells which form an intermediate station between the rostral and caudal segment of the recipient spinal cord. In particular, here we describe how neural stem cells-derived neurons are endowed with the ability to extend long-distance axons to regain the transmission of motor and sensory information.

PMID:
28007647
PMCID:
PMC5466898
[Available on 2018-06-23]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2016.12.002
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center