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Hematol Oncol Clin North Am. 2017 Feb;31(1):131-141. doi: 10.1016/j.hoc.2016.08.004.

Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

Author information

1
Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Box 8056, St Louis, MO 63110, USA.
2
Thoracic Oncology Research Program, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, WWW221, New Haven, CT 06520-8028, USA.
3
Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Box 8056, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: dmorgens@dom.wustl.edu.

Abstract

The treatment of patients with good performance status and advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer has been based on the use of first-line platinum-based doublet and second-line docetaxel. Immunotherapy represents a new therapeutic approach with the potential for prolonged benefit. Although the vaccines studied have not shown benefit in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, immune checkpoint inhibitors against the PD-1/PD-L1 axis showed increased overall survival compared with docetaxel in randomized clinical trials, which led to the approval of nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Because only a minority of patients benefit from this class of drugs, there has been an intense search for biomarkers.

KEYWORDS:

Immune checkpoint inhibitors; Non–small cell lung cancer; PD-L1; Vaccines

PMID:
27912829
DOI:
10.1016/j.hoc.2016.08.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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