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Neurosci Lett. 2017 Jan 10;637:142-147. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2016.11.035. Epub 2016 Nov 18.

Outbred CD1 mice are as suitable as inbred C57BL/6J mice in performing social tasks.

Author information

1
Departments of Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8082, USA.
2
Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8082, USA.
3
Departments of Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8082, USA. Electronic address: angelique.bordey@yale.edu.

Abstract

Inbred mouse strains have been used preferentially for behavioral testing over outbred counterparts, even though outbred mice reflect the genetic diversity in the human population better. Here, we compare the sociability of widely available outbred CD1 mice with the commonly used inbred C57BL/6J (C57) mice in the one-chamber social interaction test and the three-chamber sociability test. In the one-chamber task, intra-strain pairs of juvenile, non-littermate, male CD1 or C57 mice display a series of social and aggressive behaviors. While CD1 and C57 pairs spend equal amount of time socializing, CD1 pairs spend significantly more time engaged in aggressive behaviors than C57 mice. In the three-chamber task, sociability of C57 mice was less dependent on acclimation paradigms than CD1 mice. Following acclimation to all three chambers, both groups of age-matched male mice spent more time in the chamber containing a stranger mouse than in the empty chamber, suggesting that CD1 mice are sociable like C57 mice. However, the observed power suggests that it is easier to achieve statistical significance with C57 than CD1 mice. Because the stranger mouse could be considered as a novel object, we assessed for a novelty effect by adding an object. CD1 mice spend more time in the chamber with a stranger mouse than that a novel object, suggesting that their preference is social in nature. Thus, outbred CD1 mice are as appropriate as inbred C57 mice for studying social behavior using either the single or the three-chamber test using a specific acclimation paradigm.

KEYWORDS:

Aggressivity; Autism; Autistic behavior; Mouse model; Mouse strain; Social behavior; Wild type

PMID:
27871995
PMCID:
PMC5203811
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2016.11.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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