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Biol Psychol. 2018 Jan;131:63-71. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2016.11.001. Epub 2016 Nov 5.

Epigenome-wide association analysis revealed that SOCS3 methylation influences the effect of cumulative stress on obesity.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, 300 George street, Suite 901, New Haven, CT 06511, United States; Connecticut Veteran Health System, 950 Campbell Ave, Building 35, Room #43, West Haven, 06516, United States. Electronic address: ke.xu@yale.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, 300 George street, Suite 901, New Haven, CT 06511, United States; Connecticut Veteran Health System, 950 Campbell Ave, Building 35, Room #43, West Haven, 06516, United States.
3
Department of Biostatistics, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT 06511, United States.
4
Yale Stress Center, Yale University, 2 Church St S #209, New Haven, CT 06519, United States.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, 300 George street, Suite 901, New Haven, CT 06511, United States; Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, United States.

Abstract

Chronic stress has a significant impact on obesity. However, how stress influences obesity remains unclear. We conducted an epigenome-wide DNA methylation association analysis of obesity (N=510) and examined whether cumulative stress influenced the DNA methylation on body weight. We identified 20 CpG sites associated with body mass index at the false discovery rate q<0.05, including a novel site, cg18181703, in suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) gene (coefficient β=-0.0022, FDR q=4.94×10-5). The interaction between cg18181703 and cumulative adverse life stress contributed to variations in body weight (p=0.002). Individuals with at least five major life events and lower methylation of cg1818703 showed a 1.38-fold higher risk of being obese (95%CI: 1.17-1.76). Our findings suggest that aberrant in DNA methylation is associated with body weight and that methylation of SOCS3 moderates the effect of cumulative stress on obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Body mass index; Cumulative stress; Epigenome-wide association; Obesity; SOCS3

PMID:
27826092
PMCID:
PMC5419875
[Available on 2019-01-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsycho.2016.11.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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