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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Dec;64(12):2511-2516. doi: 10.1111/jgs.14380. Epub 2016 Oct 27.

Effect of a Long-Term Physical Activity Intervention on Resting Pulse Rate in Older Persons: Results from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Study.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York City, New York.
2
Section of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
3
Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina.
4
Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
5
School of Medicine, New York University, New York City, New York.
6
Geriatric Cardiology Section, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
7
School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona.
8
Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina.
9
Center for Aging and Population Health, Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
10
Section of Geriatrics, School of Medicine, Boston University, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
11
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the utility of a long-term physical activity (PA) intervention for reducing resting pulse rate (RPR) in older persons.

DESIGN:

Community.

SETTING:

Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Study.

PARTICIPANTS:

Individuals aged 70 to 89 (N = 1,635, 67.2% women) were randomized to a moderate-intensity PA intervention (n = 818) or a health education-based successful aging (SA) intervention (n = 817).

MEASUREMENTS:

RPR was recorded at baseline and 6, 18, and 30 months. Longitudinal changes in RPR of intervention groups were compared using a mixed-effects analysis of covariance model for repeated-measure outcomes, generating least squares means with standard errors (SEs) or 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS:

Mean duration of the study was 2.6 years (median 2.7 years, interquartile range 2.3-3.1 years). The average effect of the PA intervention on RPR over the course of the study period was statistically significant but clinically small (average intervention difference = 0.84 beats/min; 95% CI = 0.17-1.51; Paverage = .01), with the most pronounced effect observed at 18 months (PA, 66.5 beats/min (SE 0.32 beats/min); SA, 67.8 beats/min (SE 0.32 beats/min); difference = 1.37 beats/min, 95% CI = 0.48-2.26 beats/min). The relationship became somewhat weaker and was not statistically significant at 30 months. There were no significant differences between several prespecified subgroups.

CONCLUSION:

A long-term moderate-intensity PA program was associated with a small and clinically insignificant slowing of RPR in older persons. Whether PA can deliver a beneficial reduction in RPR requires further examination in older adults.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01072500.

KEYWORDS:

older persons; physical activity; resting pulse rate

PMID:
27787876
PMCID:
PMC5173403
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.14380
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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