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Adv Exp Med Biol. 2016;940:167-177.

Protein-Based Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA.
2
Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. lynne.regan@yale.edu.
3
Department of Chemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. lynne.regan@yale.edu.
4
Integrated Graduate Program in Physical and Engineering Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. lynne.regan@yale.edu.

Abstract

The tunable mechanical and structural properties of protein-based hydrogels make them excellent scaffolds for tissue engineering and repair. Moreover, using protein-based components provides the option to insert sequences associated with promoting both cellular adhesion to the substrate and overall cell growth. Protein-based hydrogel components are appealing for their structural designability, specific biological functionality, and stimuli-responsiveness. Here we present highlights in the field of protein-based hydrogels for tissue engineering applications including design requirements, components, and gel types.

KEYWORDS:

Biocompatibility; Hydrogels; Mechanical properties; Protein engineering; Protein materials; Self-assembly; Smart biomaterials; Stimuli-responsive materials; Tissue engineering

PMID:
27677513
PMCID:
PMC5839658
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-39196-0_8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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