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Pediatr Res. 2017 Jan;81(1-2):214-226. doi: 10.1038/pr.2016.197. Epub 2016 Sep 27.

Does prenatal stress alter the developing connectome?

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 2Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 3Department of Child Study, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 4Department of Neuroscience, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 5Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 6Department of Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 7Department of Neurosurgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 8Department of Neurology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Abstract

Human neurodevelopment requires the organization of neural elements into complex structural and functional networks called the connectome. Emerging data suggest that prenatal exposure to maternal stress plays a role in the wiring, or miswiring, of the developing connectome. Stress-related symptoms are common in women during pregnancy and are risk factors for neurobehavioral disorders ranging from autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and addiction, to major depression and schizophrenia. This review focuses on structural and functional connectivity imaging to assess the impact of changes in women's stress-based physiology on the dynamic development of the human connectome in the fetal brain.

PMID:
27673421
DOI:
10.1038/pr.2016.197
[PubMed - in process]

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