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Clin Transplant. 2016 Nov;30(11):1466-1472. doi: 10.1111/ctr.12841. Epub 2016 Oct 14.

A resilience intervention involving mindfulness training for transplant patients and their caregivers.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, USA. stonnington.cynthia@mayo.edu.
2
Private Practice, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
3
Consultant, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Department of Social Work, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, USA.
6
Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, USA.
7
Section of Transplantation and Immunology, Department of Surgery, Yale-New Haven Hospital Transplantation Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
8
Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Abstract

Solid organ and stem cell transplant patients and their caregivers report a substantial level of distress. Mindfulness-based stress reduction has been shown to alleviate distress associated with transplant, but there is limited experience in this population with other mindfulness-based interventions, or with combined transplant patient and caregiver interventions. We evaluated a novel, 6-week mindfulness-based resilience training (MBRT) class for transplant patients and their caregivers that incorporates mindfulness practice, yoga, and neuroscience of stress and resilience. Thirty-one heart, liver, kidney/pancreas, and stem cell transplant patients and 18 caregivers at Mayo Clinic in Arizona participated. Measures of stress, resilience, depression, anxiety, health-related quality of life, positive and negative affect, and sleep were completed at baseline, 6 weeks, and 3 months postintervention. At 6 weeks and 3 months, patients demonstrated significant (P<.005) improvements from baseline in measures of perceived stress, depression, anxiety, and negative affect. Quality-of-life mental component (P=.006) and positive affect (P=.02) also improved at follow-up. Most participants adhered to the program, were satisfied with class length and frequency, and reported improved well-being as a result of the class. MBRT holds promise as an intervention to enhance resilience and manage stress for transplant patients and their caregivers.

KEYWORDS:

caregivers; mindfulness; resilience; stress; transplant recipients

PMID:
27618687
DOI:
10.1111/ctr.12841
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