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AIDS Behav. 2017 Jun;21(6):1540-1549. doi: 10.1007/s10461-016-1533-4.

Feasibility of an Emotion Regulation Intervention to Improve Mental Health and Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behaviors for HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Men with Sexual Compulsivity.

Author information

1
Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training, Hunter College of the City University of New York (CUNY), New York, NY, USA. Jeffrey.Parsons@hunter.cuny.edu.
2
Health Psychology and Clinical Sciences Doctoral Program, The Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), New York, NY, USA. Jeffrey.Parsons@hunter.cuny.edu.
3
Department of Psychology, Hunter College of the City University of New York (CUNY), 695 Park Ave., New York, NY, 10065, USA. Jeffrey.Parsons@hunter.cuny.edu.
4
Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training, Hunter College of the City University of New York (CUNY), New York, NY, USA.
5
Department of Psychology, Hunter College of the City University of New York (CUNY), 695 Park Ave., New York, NY, 10065, USA.
6
Health Psychology and Clinical Sciences Doctoral Program, The Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), New York, NY, USA.
7
CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, New York, NY, USA.
8
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.

Abstract

Gay and bisexual men (GBM) report high rates of sexual compulsivity (SC), yet no empirically based treatments exist. An intervention based on the Unified Protocol for the Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders was pilot tested in a sample of 13 HIV-positive GBM with SC. Participants completed a baseline interview, and were offered up to ten intervention sessions. Of those, 11 completed a 3-month follow-up assessment. Despite problems with session attendance (only 4 men completed all 10 sessions), improvements were observed in all psychological outcomes, including SC, depression, and anxiety. Decreases were observed in drug use and HIV risk. The Unified Protocol may be useful in improving the health of HIV-positive GBM, however challenges with session attendance must be addressed. Future work should consider if fewer sessions produce similar results, whether barriers to attending all sessions could be alleviated, and how the intervention would perform compared to treatments.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive behavioral therapy; Gay and bisexual men; HIV-positive; Mental health; Sexual compulsivity

PMID:
27573858
PMCID:
PMC5332525
[Available on 2018-06-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-016-1533-4
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