Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Surg Oncol. 2016 Oct;23(10):3272-83. doi: 10.1245/s10434-016-5475-x. Epub 2016 Aug 8.

Racial Differences in Utilization of Breast Conservation Surgery: Results from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB).

Author information

1
Department of Surgery and Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
2
Department of Surgery and Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. donald.lannin@yale.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Whether rates of breast-conservation surgery (BCS) vary based on race and ethnicity has not been clearly elucidated on a national leve.

METHODS:

The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was used to identify women who underwent surgery for invasive breast cancer during 2010 and 2011. The effect of race and ethnicity on BCS rates was determined, independent of patient demographics, tumor-related variables, and geographic region.

RESULTS:

There were 299,827 patients with known race and ethnicity who underwent definitive breast surgery. BCS rates by race were as follows: 135,065/241,236 (56.0 %) for whites, 17,819/33,301 (53.5 %) for blacks, 4,722/9,508 (49.7 %) for Asian/Pacific Islanders, and 7,919/15,782 (50.2 %) for Hispanics (p < 0.001). Mean tumor size differed among the racial groups: 2.07 cm in whites, 2.54 cm in blacks, 2.23 cm in Asians, and 2.48 cm in Hispanics (p < 0.001). When stratified by tumor size, BCS was most common in blacks and least common in Asians for all tumors >2 cm (p < 0.001). On multivariable analysis adjusted for age, tumor size, nodal status, grade, molecular type, geographic area, urban/rural residence, insurance status, and census-derived median income and education for the patient's zip code, the odds ratio for BCS for blacks compared to whites was 1.23 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.20-1.27, p < 0.001), for Asians was 0.84 (95 % CI 0.80-0.88, p < 0.001), and for Hispanics was 1.00 (95 % CI 0.96-1.05, p = 0.885).

CONCLUSIONS:

When adjusted for patient demographics, tumor-related variables, and geographic area, BCS rates are higher in blacks and lower in Asians compared to whites.

PMID:
27503494
DOI:
10.1245/s10434-016-5475-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center