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Tumour Biol. 2016 Oct;37(10):13595-13606. Epub 2016 Jul 28.

Identification of aldolase A as a potential diagnostic biomarker for colorectal cancer based on proteomic analysis using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

Author information

1
Pathological and Biomolecule Analyses Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kindai University, Osaka, Japan.
2
Department of Integrated Diagnostic Pathology, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8602, Japan.
3
Departments of Gastrointestinal Hepato Biliary Pancreatic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Department of Integrated Diagnostic Pathology, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8602, Japan. naito@nms.ac.jp.

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and many patients are already at an advanced stage when they are diagnosed. Therefore, novel biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer are required. In this study, we performed a global shotgun proteomic analysis using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) CRC tissue. We identified 84 candidate proteins whose expression levels were differentially expressed in cancer and non-cancer regions. A label-free semiquantitative method based on spectral counting and gene ontology (GO) analysis led to a total of 21 candidate proteins that could potentially be detected in blood. Validation studies revealed cyclophilin A, annexin A2, and aldolase A mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly higher in cancer regions than in non-cancer regions. Moreover, an in vitro study showed that secretion of aldolase A into the culture medium was clearly suppressed in CRC cells compared to normal colon epithelium. These findings suggest that decreased aldolase A in blood may be a novel biomarker for the early detection of CRC.

KEYWORDS:

Aldolase A; Colorectal cancer; Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue; Shotgun proteomics

PMID:
27468721
PMCID:
PMC5097088
DOI:
10.1007/s13277-016-5275-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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