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Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract. 2016 Nov;20(4):210-7. doi: 10.1080/13651501.2016.1207087. Epub 2016 Jul 19.

Childhood, adolescent and adult age at onset and related clinical correlates in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a report from the International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS).

Author information

1
a Department of Neuroscience and Mental Health , University of Milan, Fondazione IRCCS Ca'Granda , Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico , Milano , Italy ;
2
b Bipolar Disorders Clinic; Stanford University , Stanford, CA , USA ;
3
c Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences , Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center , New York , USA ;
4
d Mental Health Unit , Hertfordshire Partnership Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth II Hospital , Welwyn Garden City , UK ;
5
e Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders , University of Cape Town , Cape Town , South Africa ;
6
f Department of Psychiatry, MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders , University of Stellenbosch , Stellenbosch , South Africa ;
7
g Carracci Medical Group , Mexico City , Mexico ;
8
h Dipartimento Di Psichiatria, Neurobiologia, Farmacologia E Biotechnologie , Università Di Pisa , Italy ;
9
i Department of Psychiatry , University of Florence, and Institute of Neurosciences , Florence , Italy ;
10
j Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences , McMaster University, MacAnxiety Research Center Hamilton , Canada ;
11
k Department of Psychiatry , Sisli Eftal Teaching and Research Hospital , Istanbul , Turkey ;
12
l National and Trustwide Services for OCD/BDD, SW London and St George's NHS Trust , London ;
13
m University Multiprofile Hospital for Active Treatment in Neurology and Psychiatry Sveti Naum , Sofia , Bulgaria ;
14
n Department of Psychiatry , Academic Medical Center , Amsterdam , the Netherlands ;
15
o Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience , University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine , Chicago , IL , USA ;
16
p National Post-Trauma Center , Research Foudation by the Sheba Medical Center , Israel ;
17
q Department of Psychiatry , Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands ;
18
r Department of Psychiatry , Hospital Universitari De Bellvitge-IDIBELL, University of Barcelona, Cibersam , Barcelona , Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Many studies suggest that age at onset (AAO) is an important factor for clinically differentiating patients with juvenile and adult onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The present international study aimed to assess the prevalence of different AAO groups and compare related socio-demographic and clinical features in a large sample of OCD patients.

METHODS:

A total of 431 OCD outpatients, participating in the ICOCS network, were first categorised in groups with childhood (≤12 years), adolescent (13-17 years) and adult-onset (≥18 years), then in pre-adult and adult onset (≥18 years) and their socio-demographic and clinical features compared.

RESULTS:

Twenty-one percent (n = 92) of the sample reported childhood onset, 36% (n = 155) adolescent onset, and 43% (n = 184) adult onset. Patients with adult onset showed a significantly higher proportion of females compared with the other subgroups (χ(2 )=( )10.9, p< 0.05). Childhood- and adolescent-onset patients had been more frequently treated with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), compared to adult-onset patients (χ(2 )=( )11.5; p < 0.05). The pre-adult- versus adult-onset analysis did not show any additional significant difference.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present international multicentre study confirms that OCD onset occurs more frequently before adult age, with approximately one out of five patients showing childhood onset. Pre-adult onset was associated with higher rate of CBT, while adult onset was more prevalent in females.

KEYWORDS:

Age at onset; cognitive behavioural therapy; gender; obsessive–compulsive disorder

PMID:
27433835
DOI:
10.1080/13651501.2016.1207087
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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