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J Pediatr. 2016 Sep;176:17-22. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.06.005. Epub 2016 Jul 14.

Bedtime in Preschool-Aged Children and Risk for Adolescent Obesity.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Electronic address: sanderson@cph.osu.edu.
2
Division of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health; Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine; Center for Obesity Research and Education, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether preschool-aged children with earlier bedtimes have a lower risk for adolescent obesity and whether this risk reduction is modified by maternal sensitivity.

STUDY DESIGN:

Data from 977 of 1364 participants in the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development were analyzed. Healthy singleton-births at 10 US sites in 1991 were eligible for enrollment. In 1995-1996, mothers reported their preschool-aged (mean = 4.7 years) child's typical weekday bedtime, and mother-child interaction was observed to assess maternal sensitivity. At a mean age of 15 years, height and weight were measured and adolescent obesity defined as a sex-specific body-mass-index-for-age ≥95th percentile of the US reference.

RESULTS:

One-quarter of preschool-aged children had early bedtimes (8:00 p.m. or earlier), one-half had bedtimes after 8:00 p.m. but by 9:00 p.m., and one-quarter had late bedtimes (after 9:00 p.m.). Children's bedtimes were similar regardless of maternal sensitivity (P = .2). The prevalence of adolescent obesity was 10%, 16%, and 23%, respectively, across early to late bedtime groups. The multivariable-adjusted relative risk (95% CI) for adolescent obesity was 0.48 (0.29, 0.82) for preschoolers with early bedtimes compared with preschoolers with late bedtimes. This risk was not modified by maternal sensitivity (P = .99).

CONCLUSIONS:

Preschool-aged children with early weekday bedtimes were one-half as likely as children with late bedtimes to be obese as adolescents. Bedtimes are a modifiable routine that may help to prevent obesity.

KEYWORDS:

epidemiology; longitudinal study; maternal sensitivity; parenting; prospective; sleep

PMID:
27426836
PMCID:
PMC5003745
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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