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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016 Jul-Aug;48(7):468-477.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2016.04.398.

Barriers and Facilitators to Improve Fruit and Vegetable Intake Among WIC-Eligible Pregnant Latinas: An Application of the Health Action Process Approach Framework.

Author information

1
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT. Electronic address: amber.hromi-fiedler@yale.edu.
2
Exercise Science and Sports Studies Department, Springfield College, Springfield, MA.
3
Hispanic Health Council, Hartford, CT.
4
Women's Ambulatory Health Services, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT.
5
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Identify barriers and facilitators to improve prenatal fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)-eligible Latinas using the Health Action Process Approach framework.

DESIGN:

Qualitative data were collected via audiotaped in-depth interviews as part of a larger study to design an intervention to increase prenatal F&V intake.

SETTING:

Hartford, Connecticut.

PARTICIPANTS:

Forty-five WIC-eligible Latinas completed the study. Included women were: ≥ 18 years old; in 2nd or 3rd trimester; having a singleton pregnancy; overweight or obese (ie, pregravid body mass index ≥ 25); not on a restricted diet; nonsmokers.

PHENOMENON OF INTEREST:

Prenatal factors that promote and hinder F&V intake.

ANALYSIS:

Transcripts were independently read and coded, and a consensus was reached about emerging themes.

RESULTS:

Ten factors influenced prenatal F&V intake: social support, family structure, F&V access, F&V preferences, F&V knowledge, F&V health outcome expectations, self-efficacy, intentions, F&V action/coping planning strategies, and maternal health status.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Social support from family/friends emerged as the primary distal factor driving prenatal F&V intake. Interventions designed to empower pregnant Latinas to gain the access, confidence, knowledge, and strategies necessary to consume more F&Vs must consider strengthening support to achieve the desired outcome.

KEYWORDS:

Latina; diet; fruits; pregnancy; vegetables

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