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J Cell Biol. 2016 May 9;213(3):371-83. doi: 10.1083/jcb.201510012.

Talin tension sensor reveals novel features of focal adhesion force transmission and mechanosensitivity.

Author information

1
Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511.
2
Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow G20 0TZ, Scotland, UK.
3
School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NZ, England, UK.
4
Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093.
5
Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 Department of Cell Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 martin.schwartz@yale.edu.

Abstract

Integrin-dependent adhesions are mechanosensitive structures in which talin mediates a linkage to actin filaments either directly or indirectly by recruiting vinculin. Here, we report the development and validation of a talin tension sensor. We find that talin in focal adhesions is under tension, which is higher in peripheral than central adhesions. Tension on talin is increased by vinculin and depends mainly on actin-binding site 2 (ABS2) within the middle of the rod domain, rather than ABS3 at the far C terminus. Unlike vinculin, talin is under lower tension on soft substrates. The difference between central and peripheral adhesions requires ABS3 but not vinculin or ABS2. However, differential stiffness sensing by talin requires ABS2 but not vinculin or ABS3. These results indicate that central versus peripheral adhesions must be organized and regulated differently, and that ABS2 and ABS3 have distinct functions in spatial variations and stiffness sensing. Overall, these results shed new light on talin function and constrain models for cellular mechanosensing.

PMID:
27161398
PMCID:
PMC4862330
DOI:
10.1083/jcb.201510012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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