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Dev Neuropsychol. 2016 Jan-Mar;41(1-2):38-58. doi: 10.1080/87565641.2016.1167212. Epub 2016 May 2.

Relationships Between Impulsivity, Anxiety, and Risk-Taking and the Neural Correlates of Attention in Adolescents.

Author information

1
a Child Study Center , Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven , Connecticut.
2
b Department of Clinical Psychology , University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands.
3
c Haskins Laboratories , Yale University , New Haven , Connecticut.
4
d Department of Diagnostic Radiology , Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven , Connecticut.
5
e Departments of Epidemiology, Pediatrics and Psychology , Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven , Connecticut.
6
f Departments of Psychiatry and Neurobiology and CASAColumbia , Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven , Connecticut.
7
g Connecticut Mental Health Center , New Haven , Connecticut.

Abstract

Although impulsivity, anxiety, and risk-taking may relate to attentional processes, little research has directly investigated how each may be associated with specific facets of attentional processes and their underlying neural correlates. Nineteen adolescents performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging task involving simple, selective, and divided attention. Out-of-scanner-assessed impulsivity, anxiety, and risk-taking scores were not correlated with each other and showed task-phase-specific patterns of association. Results are discussed in light of research and theory suggesting a relationship between these domains and attention and may serve to focus future research aiming to understand these relationships.

PMID:
27135550
PMCID:
PMC5006681
[Available on 2017-05-02]
DOI:
10.1080/87565641.2016.1167212
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